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Old 07-14-2011, 05:17 AM   #31
chancetx
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I love movie review/guide books but I've noticed with everything at our fingertips on the internet there haven't been many new guides or updates of my favorites. The internet is great but nothing can replace thumbing through a book with hundreds or even thousands of different films reviewed. Thank goodness for the DVD Delirium books coming out of the UK. And great news on John Kenneth Muir's Horror Films of the 1990s.

Would love to see updates or new volumes of:

The Psychotronic Video Guide (Michael Weldon)
Terror On Tape (James O'Neill - one of my favorites)
Creature Features (John Stanley)
The Official Splatter Guide (John McCarty)
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Old 07-14-2011, 06:13 AM   #32
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Would love to see updates or new volumes of:

The Psychotronic Video Guide (Michael Weldon)
Terror On Tape (James O'Neill - one of my favorites)
Creature Features (John Stanley)
The Official Splatter Guide (John McCarty)

I'd love to see new issues of these as well.I have all the ones you've listed plus The Official Splatter Movie Guide Vol. 2.Though not exactly a ''video guide'' I've always been fond of Kim Newman's Nightmare Movies.That HAS been updated,I need to pick that one up.
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Old 07-14-2011, 07:36 AM   #33
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McCarty's Splatter Movie Guides are essential reading, if you can find them. Also out of print but well worth tracking down are Danny Peary's Cult Movies vols. 1-3.

I recently picked up a copy of Horror Movies by Daniel Cohen. It was published in 1984 and uses the key art from the original Halloween on the cover, yet makes no mention of the slasher craze of the early 80's. Talk about an oversight.

Horror Films by Nigel Andrews is a bit better, a little more scholarly in approach, and actually has some really salient points to make about horror archetypes, but is a bit too dismissive of more contemporary films. It was published in 1985.

And, of course, David J. Skal's The Monster Show is an indispensable classic.
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Old 07-14-2011, 04:38 PM   #34
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When it comes to horror review books, the most in depth and informative are by John Kenneth Muir. His nearly 800 pages of reviews in Horror Films of the 1970s (released as 2 paperback volumes) and the even better Horror Films of the 1980s (a single hardcover release) are must owns. Horror Films of the 1990s comes out in August and looking at the jump in writing quality between the previous volumes, should be the best yet.
I have the 80s one and agree, it is great. The 70s one was actually first released as 1 hardcover but it is hard to find now and OOP. I have been trying to find that version to match the 80s hardcover I have and the new 90s one that comes out.
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Old 07-14-2011, 06:51 PM   #35
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My favorite academia during my college years:

The American Nightmare: Essays on the Horror Film (Robin Wood)
Men, Women, and Chainsaws: Gender in the Modern Horror Film (Carol Clover)
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Old 07-15-2011, 12:42 AM   #36
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Legacy of Blood: A Comprehensive Guide to Slasher Movies by Jim Harper



The Hammer Story by Marcus Hearn and Alan Barnes

both are worthwhile reads
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Well as the video explains, I do not think it is a great film, nor do I think.
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Old 07-15-2011, 02:30 AM   #37
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I have They Came From Within: A History of Canadian Horror and Terror on Tape. I really enjoyed Terror on Tape and what I've read of They Came from Within... but I have only read parts because I haven't seen all the films yet.
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Old 07-15-2011, 03:17 AM   #38
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has anybody read this? as a kid i found it in the library and read it cover to cover. years later i found it used, and picked it up. haven't read through it again yet. it's broken up by subject, with one chapter on vampires, one on frankenstein, one on zombies, one on witches, etc. each one details the history of the subject, then looks at its place in classic literature and then films.

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Old 07-15-2011, 03:28 AM   #39
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My Bible.


Recently started to read The Complete History of the Return of the Living Dead. Pretty interesting and extremely extensive so far.
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Old 07-15-2011, 03:57 AM   #40
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I have the 80s one and agree, it is great.
I wanted to like the 80s book by Muir, but after reading review after review in which he inserts lengthy assertions that the particular film was a commentary on a grand social issue - and in this volume, AIDS and/or homophobia were the favorites - I pretty much gave up. Sure, many films - particularly in the *late* 80s - had a nod or even clear charge to such a message. But if Muir was to be believed those messages (again, in particular AIDS or homophobia) were pervasive throughout horror cinema production from the turn of that decade.

The commentary hit a particularly ridiculous level when the AIDS reference was made to "The Thing" . Not that the comparison was made, as *in retrospect* it is fairly obvious here - contrary to some of Muir's other references where the comparison is a stretch. But that Muir makes page after page of direct statements that the comparison was *intended* by the film. Which would be all well and good if the film had been released in 1992 - rather than *1982*. Making the claim the comparison was intended a rather glaring bit of retro-active continuity on Muir's part, as the CDC had barely acknowledged the disease when the film was in production, its method of transmission was still unclear, the public and news media was almost completely unaware of it, the term AIDS was still a month away of being introduced at the time of the film's release, and Carpenter himself had repeatedly denied the comparison was intended or even something he would have considered at the time.

It was this kind of reading of metaphors into films where they clearly weren't there - and ignoring glaring historical timelines in doing so - and then spending *pages* delving into the comparison - that caused me to preclude giving Muir another chance with his 90s volume. His 70s books had some over reaching issues, but IMO mostly stayed within the boundaries of film reviews rather than pontification masquerading as reviews. The 80s book steam rolled right over that line, and as insightful as Muir may have well meaningly intended to be, he over reaches to the detriment of his reviews' value. Not every horror film is a deep social issue commentary barely lurking behind buckets of fake blood, high pitched screams, and wince inducing imagery. Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.
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Old 07-15-2011, 06:03 AM   #41
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Nice post Moscow

I like Michael J. Weldon's no-nonsense style in his Psychotronic Video Guide ... boy, has he done his homework! It still is and always will be my number 1 reference book.
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Old 07-15-2011, 06:18 AM   #42
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Horror Movies by Daniel Cohen
Horror Poster Art by Tony Nourmand and Graham Marsh
Horror Cinema by Jonathan Penner, Steven Hay Schneider, and Paul Duncan
Nightmare USA: The Untold Story of the Exploitation Independents by Stephen Thrower
The Art of the Nasty by Nigel Wingrove and Marc Morris
Zombie Movies: The Ultimate Guide by Glenn Kay
They Came From Within: A History of Canadian Horror Cinema by Caelum Vatnsdal
Cinema Sewer, Vol. 1 by Robin Bougie
Cinema Sewer, Vol. 2 by Robin Bougie
Eaten Alive! Italian Zombie and Cannibal Movies by Jay Slater
Videodrome: Studies in the Horror Film by Tim Lucas


And the following aren't directly related to the genre, but contain insight and reviews into certain horror titles/genres.

Showgirls, Teen Wolves, and Astro Zombies: A Film Critic's Year-Long Quest to Find the Worst Movie Ever Made by Michael Adams
Destroy All Movies!!! by Zach Carlson and Bryan Connoly
Swedish Sensationsfilms: A Clandestine History of Sex, Thrillers, and Kicker Cinema by Daniel Ekeroth
Grindhouse: The Sleaze-Filled Saga of an Exploitation Double-Feature by Robert Rodriguez and Quentin Tarantino
A History of Italian Cinema by Peter Bondanella
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Old 07-15-2011, 08:10 AM   #43
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has anybody read this? as a kid i found it in the library and read it cover to cover. years later i found it used, and picked it up. haven't read through it again yet. it's broken up by subject, with one chapter on vampires, one on frankenstein, one on zombies, one on witches, etc. each one details the history of the subject, then looks at its place in classic literature and then films.

I've never seen that one,cool find ! I do have one from the mid seventies,it's in storage right now.The cover is a shot of Peter Cushing about to cut into the skull of yet another ''experiment".Anybody recall this books title ?
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Old 02-19-2012, 01:58 AM   #44
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I own:

Crystal Lake Memories: The Complete History of Friday the 13th by Peter Bracke
Horror Films of the 1970s by John Kenneth Muir
Horror Films of the 1980s by John Kenneth Muir
Horror Films of the 1990s by John Kenneth Muir
Television Fright Films of the 1970s by David Deal
The Bigfoot Filmography by David Coleman
King Kong: The History of a Movie Icon from Fay Wray to Peter Jackson by Ray Morton
The Complete History of The Return of the Living Dead by Christian Sellers & Gary Smart
Videohound's Horror Show by Mike Mayo
The Night Stalker Companion (A 25th Anniversary Tribute) by Mark Dawidziak
Just When You Thought It Was Safe: A Jaws Companion by Patrick Jankiewicz
Shock Value by Jason Zinoman
It Lives Again! Horror Movies in the New Millennium by Axelle Carolyn
The Fearmakers by John McCarty
The Evil Dead Companion by Bill Warren
The Beast of Boggy Creek by Lyle Blackburn
Minds of Fear: A Dialog with 30 Modern Masters of Horror by Calum Waddell
If Chins Could Kill: Confessions of a B Movie Actor by Bruce Campbell
The Jaws Log (30th Anniversary Edition) by Carl Gottlieb
Monsters in the Movies by John Landis
Rue Morgue Magazine's 200 Alternative Horror Films You Need to See
Fangoria's 101 Best Horror Movies You've Never Seen
John Carpenter: Prince of Darkness by Gilles Boulenger
The Unseen Force: The Films of Sam Raimi by John Kenneth Muir
Wes Craven: The Man and His Nightmares by John Wooley
John Landis by Giulia D'Agnolo Vallan

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Old 02-19-2012, 10:12 AM   #45
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I own:

Crystal Lake Memories: The Complete History of Friday the 13th by Peter Bracke
Horror Films of the 1970s by John Kenneth Muir
Horror Films of the 1980s by John Kenneth Muir
Teenage Wasteland by J.A. Kerswell

And I enjoy all four. I consider the John Kenneth Muir books indispensable. I like the fact that they are both humourous and analytical, as well as the fact that they cover all the classics as well as many obscurities.
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