How do you feel this decade has been for horror films?

Discussion in 'General' started by Ash28M, Jun 4, 2008.

  1. Reverenddave

    Reverenddave New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2000
    Messages:
    906
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I really expect this era (mid-90's to Current) will go down as one of the golden ages of horror films. There have been so many good movies in recent years. Plenty of films from this era will become iconic horror classics.

    I wouldn't have any problem coming up with a list of 100+ great horror movies from the past 10 years. In fact, if you were to compare lists of the 100 best films from each decade, the past ten years could probably compete for the top spot.
     
  2. rxfiend

    rxfiend Joe Six-Pack

    Joined:
    May 1, 2001
    Messages:
    4,575
    Likes Received:
    162
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Southern IN
    I actually like a lot of films that have come out this "decade", though the past year and a half, it's been kind of dry. 2002 / 2003 had a lot of horror, to the point that B.O. always had a horror film in the top 5 positions. Not so much right now. Too many CGI / Family films that have been coming out as of late. As for the remake trend, I've come to accept it. I don't think it's as bad as some make it out to be. It just seems when something gets announced, remake wise, it seems to cloud over all the other horror related news. A lot of original stuff is being made and released, you just got to look for it.
     
  3. Ash28M

    Ash28M Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2002
    Messages:
    6,064
    Likes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Mississauga, ON, Canada
    I actually think the last year has and a half has been pretty great.

    The Orphanage (2007)
    Grindhouse (2007)
    [Rec] (2007)
    The Mist (2007)
    The Girl Next Door (2007)
    28 Weeks Later (2007)
    The Strangers (2008)
    Inside (2007)
    1408 (2007)
    Rogue (2007)
    30 Days of Night (2007)
    Funny Games U.S. (2007)
    The Ruins (2008)
    Vacancy (2007)
    Frontiers (2007)
    ect...
     
  4. speanroc

    speanroc I WANNA BAN

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2002
    Messages:
    2,537
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    AMERICA
    ASH i've seen u start multiple threads like this praising the 2000 decade's horror films....

    face it the 2000s r your favorite decade for horror...that's pretty obvious...

    me personally, the 2000s were complete and utter crap for horror....
     
  5. Ash28M

    Ash28M Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2002
    Messages:
    6,064
    Likes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Mississauga, ON, Canada
    Actually the 70's is my favorite decade but yeah this decade has been underappreciated.
     
  6. Yowie

    Yowie Hologram

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2001
    Messages:
    868
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Palookaville
    I could do without the countless remakes and Saw type torture stuff, but French horror is better than Italian horror today, I find that interesting.
     
  7. Criswell

    Criswell New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2004
    Messages:
    1,234
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Outside your Bedroom Window.
    All decades are filled with more weeds than flowers.

    My only peev is the stupid, repetitive and pointless amatuerish overuse of gore or as the media call it Gorenography. I like my guts and blood as much as anyone, but some of these films like Saw, EXIST for the gore, not using the gore as an effect.
     
  8. Grim

    Grim Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2002
    Messages:
    7,726
    Likes Received:
    153
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    I think there have been a lot of truly entertaining horror flicks released in this decade. I also gotta love this decade because at the beginning of it (late 2000 or early 2001) is when I discovered foreign horror. I was 13 going on 14 years old and Anchor Bay and Media Blasters were hammering these things out on VHS and DVD like nobody's business.

    Here are some of my favorites of this decade so far:

    Haute Tension
    28 Days Later
    Cabin Fever
    House of 1,000 Corpses
    Land of the Dead
    Devil's Rejects
    Dawn of the Dead (2004)
    Hostel
    28 Weeks Later
    Hostel 2
    Shaun of the Dead
    The Descent
    The Hills Have Eyes (2006)

    There's no doubt a bunch more but those are the first ones that come to mind.
     
  9. Max Yokell

    Max Yokell Guest

    Hey guys having been slightly busy over the last few years, I haven't been watching much in the way of movies and when I have I have usually been with kids so the Horror aspect has been severely lacking over the last 5 years or so..

    Now I used to really like the Italian stuff but I have seen several people mention French horror and quite honestly only two movies come to mind for me when I think of French Horror and they are Zombie Lake (Bad Bad movie) and I think it was call Rest Stop? Which is a fairly recent French movie that was very violent and gory (My kind of movie) but a little out there story wise, so what French Horror movies are people talking about that are so good.

    I have mainly been slumming it with very main stream horror for the last few years. :)

    BTW I like 2001 Maniacs which was a nice little praise of HGL.

    Max
     
  10. Max Yokell

    Max Yokell Guest


    There is nothing wrong with Gore for Gore's sake, I say the more the merrier and lets take it over the top rather then the PC shit we got in the 90's. I wish every movie would go as over the top as Dead Alive. :)

    Max
     
  11. Mutilated Prey

    Mutilated Prey Soul Stealer

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2007
    Messages:
    6,686
    Likes Received:
    304
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Texarkana
    I think it's better now than it was in the 90's. The whole Scream I Know Wht You Did Last Summer Urban Legand stuff was crap. At least now we have Hostel, Hills Have Eyes and Halloween remakes, Turistas, Wrong Turn, Wolf Creek, Devil's Rejects, Hatchet and such. I like the Saws too, but they gotta slow down - seems like they're rushing out sequels.
     
  12. MrVess

    MrVess Guest

    Remakes of sequels and prequels to remakes of sequels, that's this decade.
     
  13. thrashard76

    thrashard76 Guest

    ...pretty much.
     
  14. boycrieswolf

    boycrieswolf Guest

    One aspect that I don't think has been touched on here is the fact that these days it is a LOT harder to shock or disturb audiences with the common horror film. If you closely examine the history of horror cinema you'll notice that there has been a natural progression to top what has come before. Independent filmmakers were really pushing the envelope in the 70's with low budget horror/shock/exploitation. This seemed to continue into the 80's where it became slightly more mainstream with the arrival of franchise icons such as Freddy, Jason, Myers, etc. In the 90's it seemed like there was a revival in psychological thriller type films. Nowadays you've got guys like Eli Roth and Rob Zombie who are essentially trying to recreate a 70's grindhouse vibe with their stuff. Technology and special effects have come a long way since the classic horror of yesterday, the problem is how this technology is applied to todays films. The problem with this genre is that 90% of what you see, you've seen before. With rare exceptions, there is nothing new or exciting within this genre of film because we, as hardcore fans, have literally seen it all. This makes it increasingly difficult to praise new works and raise them to classic status when the older stuff has more sentimental value. I guess what I'm trying to say is this, I enjoy some of the newer stuff coming out and applaud an effort to do something new, for example, The Ruins, which I thought was great. I'll buy it and it will become a part of my collection. But will my memory of seeing The Ruins at the theater ever trump my memories of seeing The Thing, or The Evil Dead for the first time? Never. Why? Because the classic stuff was so groundbreaking and ahead of it's time. Most of us, especially if we were younger when we first saw them, were so blown away by what we were seeing that those films were destined to be classics in our eyes. Will Saw or Hostel ever be considered a classic to the die-hard horror community? I'm guessing probably not. Why? I'm guessing, because we've seen it all before. The pursuit of newer genre titles that make you giddy like the classics do is what I'm all about, but I seriously don't think anything new in the horror genre is ever going to 'scare' me the way stuff like the Excorcist did. In my opinion, very little of what's coming out nowadays is breaking any new ground. The evidence of this, obviously, is the grossly out-of-hand wave of remakes. Sorry for the overly long post!
     
  15. Paff

    Paff Super Moderator

    Joined:
    May 14, 2000
    Messages:
    8,467
    Likes Received:
    815
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    SoCal
    Disagree. One thing that has to be considered is time and context. We're gonna look back at these films, and put them in context with the sudden appearance of violent images from the Middle East, where beheadings and real torture are seen on a daily basis. A lot of the harsh things from the 70s horror were totally tied in with the Vietnam War, people just didn't put it together at the time. I think Saw and Hostel will be seen as a definite mark of the early 20th century culture, and will actually GROW in relevance.

    Hey, it's all good. Try some paragraph breaks next time though! :D
     
  16. boycrieswolf

    boycrieswolf Guest

    You've got a good point Paff, Saw and Hostel are definitely a product of our times, but one could argue that those film are simply capitalizing on America's current state of affairs, an exploitive reaction to today's political climate. In that sense it's almost offensive. Though those films don't bother me, there is nothing to them that excites me in the way that classic horror cinema does, (or at least did, once upon a time.)
     
  17. Matt89

    Matt89 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2004
    Messages:
    6,042
    Likes Received:
    1,290
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Toronto
    I get what you're saying there. '30s-'50s was the golden era for cinema. I pretty much PREFER films from that era. Even the bad stuff from back then is better than the worst stuff of today. But with my horror films, it's all about the '60s/'70s.

    Personally, I have a hard time watching anything post-1985/86, with very few, very rare exceptions. In my opinion, the last great horror effort that was a definite success was Hellraiser. Other than that, there was the Dawn of the Dead remake. Brilliant. Then The Descent, The Ruins and the directing style of The Strangers. Unfortunately, its narrative structure is just awful. I think The Strangers had the potential to be one of the great horror films of this decade but sadly it falls short in that department. It worked wonderfully as a horror film. It relied on suspense rather than gore and I believe it is far more effecetive than leaving the audience/spectator repulsed with violence. There were so many moments when you were left literally on the edge of your seat beacuse of the way the film was directed. It ends up being a strange little film, though. Is it a great horror movie? No. Is is a bad one? No. It seems to be in-between, more like lost potential. But, does it function well as a horror movie, and does it accomplish what it sets out to do? Yes, and I believe with great success.

    However, the best era for horror films I believe is the late '60s into the late '70s/early '80s. (No later than 1981/82.) Some of the greatest horror films of all-time came out in that era. Night of the Living Dead, Black Christmas, Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Carrie, Repulsion, The Last House on the Left, Rosemary's Baby, The Exorcist, The Fury, Halloween...the list goes on. I personally think that was one of the most influential decades for the horror genre. It brought horror into everyday life. It was no longer monsters from another planet, but horror as a raw, gritty reality.

    Now, it seems as if horror films are made specifically to gross out the spectator. Like, "oh let's see how far we can go THIS time!" With mindless garbage like Hostel, Saw and the Texas Chainsaw Massacre remakes (TCM: The Beginning is one of the most depraved pieces of shit I've ever seen.) I think horror today is at an all-time low. With remakes left, right and centre it's hard to imagine if the genre can actually get worse. I sometimes doubt myself as to what is ACTUALLY good. Like The Descent or The Ruins...was it actually good? Or, was it good only compared to the relentless garbage that floods the cinema today. As for myself, I'm perfectly happy with the horror films that have been made in the past. It can't be re-created...why? Because the '60s and '70s are over. It can't be recreated or retreived because the past is irretrievable.

    ~Matt
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2008
  18. x666x

    x666x Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2002
    Messages:
    2,066
    Likes Received:
    216
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Canada
    I pretty well agree with that. Even an original film today is an homage to something that was made in the late 70's. Rob Zombie's whole career is based on that. And all zombies films have NOTLD to thank.

    I do think that if I went back to 1985, and I rented the Descent on Beta, I think I would still really like it, though. It is hard to measure if the genre just ran out of gas or am I (we?) just jaded growing up in the 80's and watching horror. Both?
     
  19. KGBRadioMoskow

    KGBRadioMoskow Makes any meat boneless!

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2004
    Messages:
    1,376
    Likes Received:
    442
    Trophy Points:
    83
    errant post deleted
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2008
  20. KGBRadioMoskow

    KGBRadioMoskow Makes any meat boneless!

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2004
    Messages:
    1,376
    Likes Received:
    442
    Trophy Points:
    83
    If I was to carve up the 80s into major horror trends, it wouldn't be two different flavors of slasher flicks. Slasher flicks - of any variant - would be one camp. The resurgance of the Gothic style tale starring monsters from science would be the other - starting with Alien in 79 and progressing through films like Scanners (81), The Thing (82), Videodrome (83), Re-Animator (85), The Fly (86), Prince of Darkness (87), The Blob (88), etc.

    Not to mention a host of lesser, but often entertaining, knock offs like Xtro (83), Life Force (85), Galaxy of Terror (81), and many more often best forgetten.

    Hellraiser (87) is sort of an odd duck, standing with a foot in each genre, but it also is clearly a product of the two main trends. Basically it was the "slashers and space monsters" that dominated the 80s in horror. If you wanted to put 80's horror in a nutshell, Jason shouldn't have taken his machette after Freddy, he should have shared screen time with the Predator.

    Creepshow (82) might qualify as a third (comparitively minor) trend that had its kick start in the 80s. That of the EC inspired horror anthology that popped up repeatedly on screen through the following decade. Only to finally land in various TV based incarnations by decades end, such as Tales From the Darkside (83), Hitchhiker (83), Tales From the Crypt (89), a retread of Twilight Zone (85). Then latter on another Twilight Zone, the Outer Limits retread, and arguably even up to modern psuedo anthologies like Masters of Horror. Not that the anthology idea ever died out prior to Creepshow, with some notables in the 70s, but this was when the resurgance really kicked in.

    Dead Zone (83), The Brood (79), Jacob's Ladder (90), Misery (90), and a few notable others were evidence that psychological horror wasn't going away, but more just evidence that some good ideas never die. In terms of dominant genres the decade clearly belonged to the likes of "Chucky" Lee Ray and Crawford Tillinghast.
     

Share This Page