Anyone remember Mr. Boogedey?

Discussion in 'General' started by KillerCannabis, Nov 12, 2001.

  1. rhett

    rhett Administrator

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    There are a few interesting Disney oddities on Disney+. Mick Garris' fun debut, FUZZBUCKET, is also a welcome inclusion there too. They've got the WITCH MOUNTAIN movies on there as well, though WATCHER IN THE WOODS and SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES are curiously absent for the time being. Disney sure had an interesting catalog in the 70s and 80s, and at least Disney+ is a step towards fulfilling the demand for some of their obscure or racier product without having to draw attention to a full fledged release. Hope that means we can get a restored transfer of one of their greatest technological achievements, SONG OF THE SOUTH, since I did notice they had a few films on there (THE UGLY DASHUND) where in the advisory they cite that the film had "outdated cultural representation" or something to that affect - at least they are acknowledging their history now, however divisive, rather than just simply denying any problematic film exists entirely.
     
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  2. X-human

    X-human I ate my keys

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    Song of the South is too much of a lightning rod. If anything holding that back allows them to release other controversial titles with less scrutiny because they can always point to their exclusion of SotS as proof of their sincerity.

    Which is too bad. I watched SotS not too long ago and while the live action portions are questionable they show the reality of the situation more than detractors care to admit. But the animated sections are wonderful and are a time capsules of the folktales African Americans were telling their children. Having Uncle Remus sharing them with a wealthy white boy, a poor black boy and a poor white girl sitting together is a message of inclusion. Detractors focus too much on what it could have shown instead of what it did show.

    It'll be interesting to see how future generations view it. When they bother too. I was watching Holiday Inn last Christmas with my teenage cousin and she alternates between living with her father in the deep red farm country and her mother in the deep blue city. When she saw the nappy haired actress in blackface she literally asked, "Why is she dressed that way?" She was completely confused by the black face minstrel song for Abe Lincoln's birthday in the film. She had no frame of reference. These racist stereotypes are being forgotten. It's hard to imagine these ancient films, when any child happens to watch them, impressing them with racial bias. In another generation or two will a "tar baby" have any kind of racial connotation? Will kids now a century removed from farm life look on African Americans returning from the fields heads bowed with a sad song in their hearts and say, "Gee, Reconstruction era life doesn't seem so bad after all! I don't know what the fuss was all about." ? I rather doubt it.
     

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